HomeReviewsInterviewsStoreABlogsOn Writing

Damn, Keith Olbermann is good. I’ll fight you for him Angie.

The African American people who voted for this should know better. There I said it.

You know why? Because not too long ago, it was illegal for them to marry the ones that they loved.

Stolen from Angela James’ blog.

36 Comments »


  • loonigrrl
    November 12
    8:58 am

    Keith Olbermann is my hero.

    ReplyReply


  • Dawn
    November 12
    9:18 am

    This was an emotional and empassioned monologue. So moving and everything that he said is so true. I just don’t understand why anyone would vote yes to this.

    ReplyReply


  • Nora Roberts
    November 12
    9:37 am

    It really can’t be said any better than this.

    ReplyReply


  • MIreya
    November 12
    11:35 am

    I have been wondering if the fact that a huge number of Hispanics actually voted in this election (more than usual) had any impact on this. We Hispanics are mostly Roman Catholic, and homosexualism is perceived as a “sin” by many Hispanic Roman Catholics. I wonder…

    ReplyReply

  • Mireya,

    I have only secondhand information, but we were chatting about this on another forum I belong to, and someone brought up that they’d seen a report that said it was so, that there were an increased number of minorities who came out to vote for Obama, and they also voted to pass Proposition 8, perhaps for the reason you said? I’d like to see the article/report cited but haven’t.

    However, I would also argue that many people who go to vote often vote “yes” on propositions. It’s why people fight to get their proposition/amendments worded in such a way that “yes” is the beneficial vote to them. Because people will more likely go down the ballot and just “check” yes.

    Kind of on a tangent, but I always thought you could just skip voting for those things you’re not familiar with, but on election day, ballots in Florida were being rejected because people hadn’t voted for what was on the back of their ballots, which made me think that you HAD to vote for everything there. Seems odd to me. You should be able to pick and choose.

    ReplyReply

  • Angela here is an overview of the vote from AP…

    By LISA LEFF
    Associated Press Writer

    LOS ANGELES (AP)

    http://www.wtopnews.com/?sid=1503263&nid=213

    ReplyReply


  • Randi
    November 12
    3:01 pm

    It always seems like it’s darkest right before the dawn…have hope, everyone. 😉

    ReplyReply

  • Prop 8 did not go down as a result of either Obama voters or blacks or Latinos. It was a generational issue. See Nate Silver who is the polling god. You guys can have Olbermann. Silver is the one who rocks my socks.

    http://www.fivethirtyeight.com/2008/11/prop-8-myths.html

    ReplyReply

  • I loves me some Keith. You’ve got to love a man who says what he believes and believes what he says.

    ReplyReply

  • Anyone who voted yes on Prop 8 should be ashamed, not just African Americans. There are a lot of factors in play here as to the whys and hows more people voted yes, but basically what it boils down to it, most people made their choices based on their religious beliefs.

    This was a religious initiative backed by the Mormon, Evangelical and Catholic Churches. So bottom line, this should never have been on the ballot in the first place.

    ReplyReply


  • Dakota
    November 12
    5:31 pm

    A columnist I’ve read for years summed up my feelings on the African American vote for Prop 8:

    http://www.miamiherald.com/living/columnists/leonard-pitts/story/767511.html

    But on the whole? I don’t think we should waste any more time pointing fingers, whether it’s at the elderly, African Americans, Mormons, etc. Struggles for equality are won through–if you’ll forgive the cheesy phrasing–winning the hearts and minds, not by pointing fingers. Our work here begins anew.

    ReplyReply

  • I don’t think anyone here was pointing fingers, I think it was more a discussion of figuring out how and why it passed, and I think that discussion IS important, because it can help everyone figure out how to keep it from happening again. If my state is next, I want to be armed with as much knowledge as possible about how to prevent it. It’s my turn to use cheesy phrasing, but knowledge is power.

    ReplyReply


  • Dakota
    November 12
    7:09 pm

    Sorry, this is probably why I lurk and don’t usually comment. I didn’t mean anyone was pointing fingers HERE. I should have been more clear. The “we” I was referring to was more society, or the general us. I was thinking more of the media who have been running stories about “blank” steal gay rights, and insert either African Americans or Mormons (the two I’ve seen used the most) or the netroots crowd who have started websites and blogs like http://www.mormonsstoleourrights.com/. I think discussion is important, absolutely, and understanding the whys of the current outcome so we can plan for the future. I guess I was just trying to express my nervousness at the consequences of assigning blame to any one group, especially other minorities, as I personally think it demeans the struggle for equality. I also think it’s important to remember that Prop 22–the ballot measure to ban same-sex marriage in California in 2000–passed with 61%, where as Prop 8 passed with only 52%, so I take heart in that. Sorry if I put my foot in it.

    ReplyReply


  • Emmy
    November 12
    7:25 pm

    Wow…I *heart* Keith O.

    Hating on blacks and other Christians for hating on gay people harder just makes one big ball of hate. Reverse discrimination is ineffective at best. I think these people are *wrong*, but I don’t think the vote was by and large a malicious one. People voted in a way that expressed their understanding of their religious doctrine.

    Having said that…

    My belief that Christianity in general is pure propaganda bullshit doesn’t invalidate anyone’s belief in their God, and I respect that. However, I don’t agree that there’s anything in anyone’s bible against gay marriage, and everyone has to admit that not every verse in the bible is followed to the letter either. The bible condones slavery and tells slaves that it is their religious duty to obey their masters:

    “Slaves, obey your human masters in everything; don’t work only while being watched, in order to please men, but work wholeheartedly, fearing the Lord.” (Colassians 3:22)”Slaves are to be submissive to their masters in everything, and to be well-pleasing, not talking back .” (Titus 2:9) Uh..yeah..lemme get back to you on that. No thanks.

    “Women should be silent in the churches, for they are not permitted to speak, but should be submissive, as the law also says.” (1 Corinthians 14:34) WTF??? I guess I’m going to hell for reals. Oh well.

    ReplyReply

  • Well it is not like the news media is spinning anything since the information I tend to read all comes from the groups responsible.

    Like here is an announcement from ProtectMarriage.com about a get together they had …

    http://news.findlaw.com/prnewswire/20081022/22oct20081911.html

    Then it gets observed at the actually polls by the AP who interviews people and why they voted…

    http://www.wtopnews.com/?sid=1503263&nid=213

    Then you get commentators who are members of the Mormon Church reporting those goings on…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVUecPhQPqY

    So no one is making up all these facts when this is coming from the actual sources. The tricky part is in the analysis but I think the ones that mean anything are not just the numbers from the polls.

    ReplyReply

  • Oh that third link should be this one…

    http://www.sltrib.com/ci_10798657

    ReplyReply

  • That Kirby link is seriously funny. Thanks for sharing that, Teddy.

    Dakota, no worries. I think we’re all on the same page with this one–it sucks no matter which way you put it!

    ReplyReply

  • You guys can have Olbermann. Silver is the one who rocks my socks.

    Sorry, Jane, but Olbermann is a guy who can do both politics AND sports. Anyone ever see him on ESPN, he still does it on the weekends, sometimes. I see him doing football highlights and immediately drop everything to watch. Any guy who can do double duty and do it so intelligently and passionately…mmmm.

    ReplyReply

  • Sorry, Angie, but Nate Silver is a genius and he developed Pecota which accurately predicts to the player how well a baseball team will perform each year. I think Silver was the only one who predicted that the Tampa Bay Devil Rays would be in the playoffs after a decade mired in mediocrity. He correctly predicted the exact number of losses by the White Sox in 2007 (90).

    He projected Obama would win 833 delegates on Super Tuesday which was within a dozen of the number that O racked up. He predicted the popular vote for the Presidential election within one percentage point, predicted 49 of 50 states’ results correctly (I think he had Indiana going for McCain), and predicted all of the resolved Senate races correctly (MN was a lean Franken and Alaska was lean Repub).

    So yeah, have Olbermann. Silver is a wonk girl’s wet dream.

    ReplyReply

  • That explains it. Baseball. Blech. He’s all yours.

    Silver is a wonk girl’s wet dream.

    Bwah.

    ReplyReply


  • Nora Roberts
    November 12
    8:58 pm

    I love Olbermann, but Nate Silver is like, wow, SuperNerd. I don’t know if I would’ve made it through this election without him.

    And I also have a girl crush on Rachel Maddow.

    ReplyReply

  • I might go to Liberal Hell for this, but I kind of think Olbermann is a blowhard. I actually liked him when he was younger and thinner and on Sports Center. Love Maddow though.

    ReplyReply


  • Indida
    November 12
    10:03 pm

    Civil unions are still in effect aren’t they?

    I had heard that Prop 8 would take away everything but then I heard different.

    ReplyReply


  • di
    November 12
    11:02 pm

    @ Indida

    The marriages that happened after the State Supreme Court ruled, but before the proposition passed are in limbo right now. The wording of the prop did not explicitly say it was retroactive. Many people think they will stand as valid. The state AG has said he will fight to make sure that happens. And history has proven the courts are unwilling to apply rules retroactively, if not explicitly stated.

    Otherwise, CA doesn’t have civil unions…only domestic partnerships.

    ReplyReply

  • If this doesn’t make people truly think about what we have done, I really don’t know what will.

    ReplyReply


  • vulcan girl
    November 13
    12:48 am

    I read this diary at DailyKos, where a diarist lays out the number of blacks on California, the number that were likely to have voted, and where they live. The CNN poll that declared that 70% of black people voted in favor of the ban only polled 224 black people. Out of a potential 720,500 black voters at the polls.

    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/11/7/34645/1235

    ReplyReply

  • @ Vulcan Girl – If even 1 black person voted for Prop 8, that was one too many.

    ReplyReply


  • Alisha Rai
    November 13
    1:31 am

    “Kind of on a tangent, but I always thought you could just skip voting for those things you’re not familiar with, but on election day, ballots in Florida were being rejected because people hadn’t voted for what was on the back of their ballots, which made me think that you HAD to vote for everything there. Seems odd to me. You should be able to pick and choose.”

    Huh. I’m in Florida, and I actually asked the voter guy about that beforehand, since I did not feel comfortable voting for some local candidates and props without enough knowledge (though Tim Mahoney serves my district, so no brainer there), and I was told that only the votes I marked would be counted. I would not be penalized for those I left blank.

    I watched on the news, too, they said any ballot rejected by the machine for any reason (stray marks, double marks, etc), goes to hand counting people.

    But now I’m wondering…did I not make freedom count??? 🙁

    ReplyReply

  • Hopefully this will go to the Supreme Court. If Loving v. Virginia had been put to votes in 1967, those laws would still be in effect in those states.

    But I have read reports that gay rights advocates didn’t do nearly as much outreach in Black and Hispanic communities as the Mormon church did. That their advertisements on TV didn’t feature gay couples, but heterosexual people talking about their gay relatives. Did any of the advertising frame this as a “right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” issue instead of a religious issue?

    ReplyReply

  • Olbermann just sent Bill O’Reilly to check 538.com

    😀

    ReplyReply

  • I’ve been an Olbermann fan for a couple of years now.
    Very well-spoken, and very honest.
    Rachel Maddow, who follows him on MSNBC and puts it out there with wit and a wry smile, is a close second. SERIOUSLY.

    ReplyReply


  • Ebony
    November 13
    5:42 pm

    This is a hot topic and although it might not apply to anyone on this blog, I would like to make a suggestion–in order to gain support of Blacks–bashing them verbally in the media and online isn’t going to help the cause. You’re trying to gain their support so if or when a proposition like this comes back up, that it’ll be in support of the results you want. The bashing only alienates people.

    I can’t recall the exact saying, but you can catch more bees with honey than with venom.

    ReplyReply


  • vulcan girl
    November 13
    10:58 pm

    What Ebony said.

    Pointing the finger at an entire group of people and saying “You did this!” is not the way to go.
    I’ve also heard the same things that Seressia did, that there was little to no outreach to non-white communities by the gay community regarding Prop 8.

    ReplyReply


  • Nikki
    November 14
    12:09 am

    While I completely disagree with the results of the vote for Prop 8, I don’t think we should run to blame one particular segment of the population. The claim that not one black person should have voted for it is inappropriate. People vote how they see it, while I didn’t want people to vote for McCain I asked them to simply vote and exercise their rights.

    Multiple groups voted for the proposition, black, white, asian, gay, straight, bi, old, young, middle-aged. Do not blame one group, identify the underlying issue and try to set up goals to correct it. Yes, blacks went out to vote in higher numbers than previous years, so did a lot of other people. The biggest thing about this is outreach and education of the groups. People will vote based on what they understand and know. One of the biggest negatives of this vote is how I see groups blaming all of this on the “black” vote in California. All this does is make people who might have come over to your side feel hunted and defensive.

    I see this as an opportunity for the gay community to start reaching out and getting into different neighborhoods and associations. I think the biggest disadvantage was that the people supporting Prop 8 funded the advertising and did a lot of outreach. Personally i don’t think the church groups had any business pouring money into the coffers. But that is a different issue. If nothing else, the fact that it only barely passed proves that people are learning and changing.

    ReplyReply

  • I am not bashing all Black people when calling Apostle Frederick K.C. Price or Dr. Beverly “Vam” Crawford homophobic prejudice liars because that is the only thing I can even come up with after their whole Vote Yes on Prop 8 “we shouldn’t do anything to jeopardize the future of our family and our children.”.

    Is that coded for those sinful Gays are a bunch of pedophiles after our kids or what?

    After that pure Fred Phelps venom inspired moment I don’t want their support, or spend a moment of my time on them because frankly I don’t like haters.

    I do want people to know who said exactly what, who paid for what, who organized what, because in all honesty it is and should continue to be a hot topic. Because in this case obviously the religious freaks with the hate speech worked.

    If you want to accuse me of bashing anything it is usually religion not race which causes the prejudice that I have had to deal with.

    ReplyReply

  • I mean look at this…

    http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=9344595

    I am not making this up folks. The churches don’t care about homeless or the hungry anymore they care about their politics. You either vote the way they want you to vote, support them funding political campaigns or get out.

    ReplyReply

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment