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Well, another day, another mass shooting in the US.

A US man has killed himself after shooting dead his estranged wife, his daughter and two other relatives in rural north Alabama.

The body of Kevin Garner was found near his home in Priceville, according to Lauderdale County’s chief investigator, Travis Clemmons.

The house had also been burned to the ground.

The bodies of Garner’s estranged wife Tammy, their 16-year-old daughter, his sister and his sister’s 11-year-old son were earlier found at a house in Green Hill, near the Tennessee Line.

The Garners are said to have been due to divorce with court proceedings set for Wednesday.

I don’t think that the correlation between guns being readily available to any Tom, Dick and Harry, and the high level of gun crime in the US, is an accident.

Personally, I hate guns. Yeah, you should be able to protect yourself in your home, but I don’t see why that has to involve keeping a gun. I know that owning a gun is part of the US constitution, but in my mind, just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. And don’t get me started on people teaching their kids to shoot guns.

When I was in the States a couple of years ago, I was appalled that guns were sold in the same place as a tin of baked beans. I just couldn’t get my head round it.

The sad thing for me is that gun crime in Britain seems to be growing exponentially, but I’m guessing that if we started arming our police as a matter of course, those numbers would probably increase tenfold.

Every time I hear about a shooting incident, especially one that takes so many lives, my stance on guns is strengthened.

Guns are dangerous, and yes, they kill people. If there was ever a vote in this country to decide whether to make guns accessible to the ordinary man on the street, I would definitely vote no.

What say you? What are your thoughts on gun ownership? Do you in fact own a gun? If so, what are your main reasons for having one in the house?

40 Comments »

  • We have very tough gun laws in Australia. You cannot walk into a shop and buy a gun. I like that. My father was in the army and I have always understood what weapons do and how they should be treated with respect. I believe too many people think it’s the answer to all problems in life. Shoot – kill – problem solved. I believe, for civilians, guns have their place on farms etc but unless you are in the defence forces or law enforcement – why do you need a gun?

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  • Sparky
    April 15
    10:18 am

    I live in constant joy that guns are so rare here in britain and that our police are routinely unarmed (after recent events, I’m extremely happy the average policeman doesn’t have firearms!)

    I cannot imagine living somewhere where guns are so prevalent, where there’s a good chance people around you may be armed, where the houses you visit may have guns in them… the very idea boggles.

    Even if I lived in America I couldn’t stand to have one – the idea of it nearby would just discomfort me too much – but when there are so many guns or guns are so common I don’t know what I’d do

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  • Donna T.
    April 15
    11:47 am

    I live in the US and have no problem with citizens having a gun for their protection, or hunting legally in season. However, I think that everyone who wants a gun should subject themselves to an extensive background check. I am appalled that guns are sold to anyone who shows up with money in hand. Also, I think that people should be limited to one gun and absolutely no automatic weapons. What possible reason could a private citizen have for owning an AK47? It makes no sense that they are available. And limiting people to one gun would eliminate the arsenals that are allowed to be acquired now. Something needs to be done to stem the flood of guns, but as long as the NRA is such a powerful lobby I don’t hold out much hope.

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  • No, I don’t own a gun. I have kids, I’m a klutz and I’m also paranoid…that’s why I don’t own one. 😉 I’d be a disaster in the making, trust me.

    I’m not against the right to own guns, but I do think gun control needs to be improved. The big problem I see, though, is that the people who should never ever have one will always find a way to get one. 🙁

    My heart and prayers go out to this family.

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  • Cindy
    April 15
    11:58 am

    I don’t even believe in hunting! No, I don’t think guns should be so prevalent and certainly not in a home with children. Of course, they are the ones to typically have guns. They totally unnerve me. My Mother always talked about the gun she had, which Dad and I neither one ever saw. Until.

    She went in the nursing home with Alzheimer’s and I was cleaning out a dresser drawer and my fingers brushed it. I slid the door shut, removed the cats from the room and allowed no one else back in until Dad was home. And then we went to the cops and had them remove it. The sad thing…it was an antique and would have probably fetched a good bit of money. I just wanted it gone.

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  • Stephi
    April 15
    12:04 pm

    My mother taught me to shoot at the age of 12. I learned to shoot a shotgun, rifle, and .357. She wanted me to know how dangerous they were and destructive. She wanted me to feel the kick and learn to compensate. She told me that they were for protection only and only pull a gun ready to kill the other person.

    Just last month in my town, a home invasion was stopped when the occupant shot one of the four men coming into his house. The criminals were also armed but they fled. One of their crew was taken to the emergency room.

    Where I live crime is on the rise. One lady was raped in front of her children. These people are evil and it wouldn’t bother me to protect my children and home. It seems to me that criminals have far more guns than honest people. I understand people arming themselves.

    That being said, I don’t own a gun. I own pepper spray. My husband owns hunting rifles that are locked until the season.

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  • Karmyn
    April 15
    12:13 pm

    I live in Texas where there is very much a gun culture. I’ve always seen the problem not as guns themselves, but the lack of education and respect many people seem to have for guns. I was taught from a young age to respect guns, to always treat any gun as if it was loaded even if I knew it wasn’t or the safety was on, to never point a gun at anything I didn’t intend to shoot. My dad keeps his guns unloaded and probably the last time he fired one was to kill a snake. My neices and nephew were taught the same things my sisters and I were about guns. I’ve never done any shooting other than a bit of target shooting with a .22. I don’t think guns are ever going to go away in America, but people must learn to respect guns. Education is the key.
    I think part of the reason gun culture is so prevelant in America, especially here in Texas, is that to us, the Wild West wasn’t that long ago, that there are people in living memory who needed guns to survive.
    But I understand why many people don’t like guns. There is pending legislation in Texas to do away with gun bans on university campuses. I am against this. You don’t need a gun for protection or to hunt for food on a university campus.

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  • I’m very opposed to it unless you are a hunter. Here in Canada we have VERY strict gun laws but living so close to the US they make there way across the border very easily. For the life of me I do not understand and never will understand the proliferation of guns in the US. To me it’s totally insane and I don’t get the justifications. I was watching for example a show the other night and they did mock assaults on meetings. They gave one of the test crew a gun to see how they would react. Without fail each one who had a gun either couldn’t get it out in time, almost accidently ‘shot’ someone else and in every case got ‘shot’ themselves.
    I doubt very much if the forefathers had what’s going on in these times had that in mind when they drafted the constitution.
    I watched another show where they had some guy try to buy as many guns as he could in a certain amount of time. It was appalling how easy it was and how many he got.
    Nope – do not understand the proclivity of guns in the United States.

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  • When we married, my husband had a gun, but he sold it. I have a child with Asperger’s in the house. He doesn’t see things as a normal kid would nor does he understand things in the same way. It was too big a chance to take with him being here, so it had to go. Though it didn’t go far–my dad bought it.

    I was taught to shoot guns at a young age, mostly because I went hunting with my dad when little (that is before my little brother was old enough).

    I have nothing against people having guns, however, that’s provided they do not have a record are can legally own one. It’s sad that people who legally aren’t supposed to have guns do have them. If those rules were better enforced and it was made more difficult for these people to get guns, then perhaps one boy I knew would still be alive today. He was accidentally shot by a friend at the age of 15 with a hand gun. The gun should never have been in that house to begin with. And if children are going to be around guns, then they need to be taught the right and the wrong way to handle the things. Too many kids are killed because they think they’re toys. We were taught early on to never tough the guns unless dad was with us to help.

    Not really related, but they are trying to ban the selling of toy guns here after a 12y/o was shot by police because they thought he was armed–he was holding a plastic toy gun.

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  • sallah
    April 15
    1:11 pm

    I have very mixed feelings right now. We are a family that hunts (the deer population needs thinning in our area)… I was raised around guns, taught to treat every one as though it were loaded, taught never to point it at anyone, and they were locked up. So in general I don’t have a problem with guns.

    Last week, my cousins daughter was shot and killed by a kid who had a gun “for protection”, and from accounts,was showing off and being cocky with it, pointed it at my 18 year old niece,just a month shy of her high school graduation, and shot her…

    The worst thing is that they paniced, and didn’t call 911, taking her to the hospital later… She might well have survived otherwise…

    He is a 17 year old kid who has completely screwed up his life forever,she is a girl who won’t have anymore life… Her parents and brother will never truly get over this… Just so frickin senseless

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  • No offense but as an American I don’t really think gun ownership is quite as widespread as it’s being made to sound. Nobody in my immediate acquaintance owns a gun, the schools in our neighborhood have had no shootings and well, if people are planning to kill, they’ll find a way to do it with or without guns.

    I do think the amount of sensationist news is on the uprise however and that’s available to us all.

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  • Unless you count the ones strapped to police officers, I have never even seen a gun in real life.

    I’m against guns for all citizens except police officers and those at war.

    When my younger children go on play dates there are a few things I ask the parents. Are there any smokers in the home, and are there any guns. If they answer is yes, then my kids don’t go there.
    Even if the guns are locked up tight with ammunition locked in a separate location.

    The only exception is if the gun owner is a police officer.

    There is a family down the street who has a sign on their door that is a picture of a hand holding a gun. In red letters is says ‘We don’t call 911’.
    Ugh.

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  • M E 2
    April 15
    2:21 pm

    There is a family down the street who has a sign on their door that is a picture of a hand holding a gun. In red letters is says ‘We don’t call 911?.
    Ugh.

    And this alone means they have/own a gun? Ugghhh indeed @@

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  • Marianne McA
    April 15
    2:29 pm

    Sallah, that’s so tragic. I’m sorry for your loss.

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  • Unfortunately, I don’t think guns will ever be as strictly controlled in the U.S. as they are abroad. I think all we can hope for is stricter legislation on who can purchase guns and where they are sold. I agree, the “guns in aisle three” thing weirds me out too.

    I’m a mess with nonlethal stuff, so why tempt fate? I carry a taser (low level, not one of those ones that can stop a person’s heart) and pepper spray.

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  • Sallah, just read your comment. So sorry :(. How horrible.

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  • Sallah, that is horrible. I’m so sorry. For your family and for that foolish boy’s.

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  • Guns don’t kill people. Knives don’t kill people. Rocks don’t kill people. People kill people. And if someone truly wants to kill someone, they will. How many family members have been choked, smothered, drowned, or killed with a blunt object? Yet the only time we hear about them is when there are several victims involved.

    In the United States, there are all sorts of gun control laws. Unfortunately, most of them simply prevent the average citizen from owning a gun. Nothing prevents anyone from having an illegal weapon and the vast majority of weapons in this country are illegal. If necessary, I could buy a gun without leaving my apartment complex and I live in a quiet neighborhood in Baltimore.

    When all the average citizens are finally disarmed, then the guns will only be in the hands of criminals. Then what?

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  • My husband has a gun. It’s mandatory for all Swiss men of a certain age to do a yearly stint in the military and they generally keep their guns at home. I really hate having the thing here, especially with kids. Obviously he keeps it locked up and the ammunition separate, but still.

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  • Donna T.
    April 15
    3:14 pm

    But, Anny, it would be VERY difficult for a person to go into a public place and stab, beat, or smother dozens of people before being disarmed. Assault weapons should not be in the hands of private citizens, especially with no background checks required, imnsho.

    Like I said above, people should not have access to automatic weapons and they should not be able to build arsenals in their homes. A handgun for personal protection and/or a hunting rifle is realistically all anyone should need.

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  • Sheila
    April 15
    3:15 pm

    I’m thankful that my grandpa taught my mom how to handle a gun. I wouldn’t be here if he hadn’t and neither would she.

    I look at gun control laws like restraining orders. If a person wants to hurt you that piece of paper stating that they are to keep so many feet away from you isn’t going to stop them. If a person wants to use a gun in a crime a gun control law will not stop them. Instead, that gun law will only keep or make it harder for the person who needs the gun for protection to get one.

    You will never see a news report where a criminal will say, “I used a knife because it’s against the law to own a gun.”

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  • Of course assault weapons should be illegal. But that will not prevent mass murder. It will just make it harder. Homemade bombs could kill much more efficiently and the ingredients are readily available. Yet no one is up in arms about that. I simply feel that murder will not be prevented by legislation. Accidental killing, maybe. But not premeditated murder.

    Personally if I were planning to kill someone, I would want something quiet… like a cast iron skillet.

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  • When I grew up there was a .22 in the house. We used it to shoot down mistletoe every Christmas and once to shoot a stray dog with rabies. Any copperheads on the porch got taken care of with a hoe, while nonpoisonous snakes got oooh’d and aaah’d over :). Yes, I grew up in the country! My dad worked for the DA’s office and they gave him a pistol of some sort, but I don’t think we had any bullets for it.

    I have mixed feelings about gun laws/gun ownership and I don’t think the solution here in the US as simple as eliminating guns on aisle 3. We don’t have drugs on aisle 3 and they’re just as big a problem, if not bigger.

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  • Stephi
    April 15
    3:59 pm

    Well said Anny.

    I also agree with Karmyn. Education is the key.

    Cast iron skillet would make an excellent weapon. Those suckers are heavy.

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  • Guns don’t kill people, people kill people, and too many dumbass people with no self-control whatsoever are doing exactly that with guns. Don’t get me wrong, I wish I could pick up a newspaper or turn on the news and hear less about murders involving guns and more incidents like that one where the homeowner scared off the intruders. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. And since there’s too many idiots out there using guns to kill their ex’s, their neighbors, their law enforcement officers, ect., there really needs to be stricter regulations in order to get a gun, and thorough background checks is a must. I look at it like this, in most states you have to go through a LOT of paperwork and a waiting period to get approval for certain rodent poisons. But as any law enforcement officer will tell you, the incidents of people being deliberately poisoned are minimal compared to the number of individuals who suffer gun-related injuries or death every single day of the week.

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  • Stephi
    April 15
    4:24 pm

    Question-Just a question. Nothing extra meant by it.

    Does anyone know how many deaths are caused by alcohol in comparison?

    The news just came on and started me thinking.

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  • sallahdog
    April 15
    4:36 pm

    not sure, but the thing is, the mass killings which gets people all up in arms is a very small part of the gun deaths… I was wondering how many people are killed by accidental gun firings every day… People who want to murder, will find a way.. But there has to be a way to be more careful with the guns already out there..

    Remember in Japan where a group used Saran(sp?) to kill a bunch of people on a subway? Crazies find a way… Even if we made all guns illegal in this country now would not get rid of the guns in criminals hands..

    Not all of us live in nice suburbs or cities were guns have no use.. When we had a farm I had to shoot several dogs that were attacking the cattle and one coyote (that was later shown to be rabid) that kept hanging around my house and charging my dogs through the fence…

    Like I said, mixed emotions.. Right now I would happily ban all guns, but I know logically its not the answer…

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  • Throwmearope
    April 15
    7:24 pm

    Colorado is part of the Wild West, too. We have Dirty Harry “Make My Day” laws–if someone enters your home and scares you, you can kill them. (Old joke, guy shoots his worthless brother-in-law at the family picnic. “Quick, Martha, drag his body into the house!”)

    We also have easily available concealed weapon permits. (The bright idea here is to teach Coloradans to be polite. The guy you’re yelling at may be carrying a concealed weapon.) I personally know 2 folks with alcohol related offenses who have permits to carry concealed. One would think that drunk driving would indicate not a good candidate for concealed weaponry. One would be mistaken, at least in Colorado.

    Be that as it may, I don’t own a gun, have never felt the need of a gun, wouldn’t want one.

    And AK-47s for sport? Only the NRA.

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  • Sallah, that’s just so terrible! My deepest sympathies to you and your family.

    As to guns, well, I’m a gun owner. I was part of the shooting team in high school and started hunting around the age of 5 or so. We lived way out in the boonies in Texas and hunting and preparing animals for consumption was just a way of life. My father, however, kept his hunting rifles in an entirely different place. To this day, I’m still not sure where he hid them but I suspect it was halfway across town in his shop. We were taught to respect weapons, treat them as if they’re always loaded, etc, but my parents never risked us getting into them unsupervised.

    Now that we’re expecting our first baby, though, I’m getting rid of my handgun. The shotgun we have for home defense is still up in the air, but it will likely be gone, baby, gone soon. DH hates, hates, hates guns and for good reason. As a child, he got a hold of his father’s shotgun and the ammunition (hidden separately) and narrowly missed blowing off his sister’s head. Needless to say that really put Dave off of guns. His father, a former Marine sniper who served in Vietnam, got rid of all the guns in their house after that.

    As to the owning of AK-47s and Uzies, yeah, that’s just ridiculous. There’s no reason for anyone to own something like that. You can’t use it for hunting and firing one of those in your house to protect against intruders would be effing stupid since adrenaline plus shaky hands plus weapon firing a bajillion rounds a second ups the likelihood of striking a family member.

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  • FD
    April 15
    8:16 pm

    Unfortunately, I don’t think the kind of gun control laws we have in the UK are necessarily practical in the US. Too many guns, registered and unregistered floating around in the general population, a lack of general support for the principle of non-escalation, and too large a land border for illegal weaponry to be imported over.
    I absolutely support them in the UK though, and according to my friend who is a detective with the Met, the automatic five year sentence for possession of illegal firearms IS a deterrent among career criminals, who reason that for burglary, they might only get a few months, so why on earth would they risk five years?

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  • Lorraine
    April 16
    12:38 am

    I don’t think that the correlation between guns being readily available to any Tom, Dick and Harry, and the high level of gun crime in the US, is an accident.

    Yep, I agree. I would never own a gun. While it’s true that people kill people, not their instruments of choice, ready access to guns makes it much easier to act impulsively and shoot someone. It’s so impersonal…you don’t even have to get dirty doing it.

    It’s a whole lot easier to get over a rage when you have to calm down. My husband and I always joke that if we owned a gun one of us would probably wind up dead *and no, there is no violence in our home, including spanking*

    When my younger children go on play dates there are a few things I ask the parents. … and are there any guns. If they answer is yes, then my kids don’t go there.
    Even if the guns are locked up tight with ammunition locked in a separate location.

    I do the same thing Seneca, (I also asked about pools).

    When President Obama was elected one of my Republican friends said she was going to buy a gun, simply because she thinks the “left wing” will be able to do away with the guns laws *fat chance, not as long as the NRA continues to make campaign contributions*.

    With the economic downturn, it seems there are more of these kind of shooting rampages. And while it’s true that there will always be criminals, if gun access was more difficult, the everyday Joe who finds himself overwhelmed and depressed might have a chance to calm himself before acting so impulsively.

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  • Teresa
    April 16
    1:12 am

    In a perfect America, gun safety/education would be mandatory for everyone, and you shouldn’t be able to buy one, without proof of education, and skill. Rather like getting a driver’s license. Prove you can handle the weapon before you can get one.
    Which leads to the question, how many more people are killed by cars everyday, compared to being killed by guns?

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  • shirley
    April 16
    5:06 pm

    I agree with the poster who cited sensationalist journalism re gun violence. According to an old Reuters article, while the US does have the most heavily armed citizenry- though please note that this article doesn’t differentiate between law-abiding citizens with guns and criminals- it’s not the only one with one gun for every two people. Yemen, Finland, and Switzerland come in second, third, and fourth with guns/per capita and you don’t hear about gun toting mass murderers from there.

    Part of the ‘problem’ with the US is that it’s a huge melting pot with many different cultures and ideals/ideas about guns all swirling together. Some folks have them for hunting primarily, some folks loathe guns (some even abhor the idea of police carrying guns), and others still are ‘meh’ about them.

    By far, though, the biggest problem with guns is that from what I could find, the majority of guns in the states aren’t held by law-abiding citizens. They’re in the hands of criminals and folks who are criminally minded. Gun control laws only work when people follow the law, something I think we could all agree criminals don’t tend to do.

    On another note, I remember a few years back there being some hubbub when some news station reported that major crime in the UK is WORSE than the US. With the exception of murder, the UK had overtaken the US in all major crimes. And, since the UK total ban in 1997 on all handguns in the hands of law-abiding citizens, UK gun violence had rose something like a staggering 53%. Here’s an old article from 2002 you can read if you like.

    Stopping regular joes from having guns *may* have stopped accidental deaths/crimes of passion where the gun is the weapon of choice in countries that use strict gun control. However, it doesn’t stop gun violence at all. It only ensures that criminals are the only ‘citizens’ who can be/are armed.

    Oh, and here are the top reasons for death in the US, from the most recent numbers I could find from the CDC:

    1. Diseases of heart
    2. Malignant neoplasms (cancer – of which only about 1 in 4 cancer deaths are *smoking* related)
    3. Cerebrovascular diseases (diseases of blood vessels supplying the brain)
    4. Chronic lower respiratory diseases
    5. Accidents (unintentional injuries)
    6. Alzheimer’s disease
    7. Diabetes mellitus
    8. Influenza and pneumonia
    9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (kidney diseases)
    10. Septicemia (blood poisoning)
    11. Intentional self-harm (suicide)
    12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis
    13. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (high blood pressure and its damage to the renal system)

    Note on number 11: something like 40% more people die every year in the US from suicide than from homicide. As to the accidents, I would imagine that automobile accidents are included in that number.

    And I gotta say, after looking at that, well, it looks like I have a better chance of a doctor screwing up (septicemia) or getting a nasty flu and dying than worrying about the neighbor going off his rocker and blowing me away. But of course, if you watch the dang news over here, why’d you’d be sure there was an army of zealots ready to storm down the nearest street and shoot up everyone.

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  • sallahdog
    April 16
    6:23 pm

    5. Accidents (unintentional injuries)

    I wonder how many of these are “gun” accidents… Its more likely to be killed by an accidental shooting, than by intentional…

    We have our guns out of the house now, my brother keeps them, locked in a gun safe (they are hunting rifles, and we no longer live in the country so its not a bother to go get them a couple times a year if hubby wants to hunt), my brother has no children in his house… I don’t have a problem with guns in the abstract, but I see far too much laxity in around the home gun safety, and frankly we don’t need a lot of new laws, but it would be nice if we enforced the laws we have now on gun control…

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  • We have guns in our home. I feel safe knowing that we’d be able to protect ourselves if something terrible happened.

    A few years ago, my family suffered a great tragedy when a family member was murdered. Her friend was killed with a knife and she was drowned. A gun isn’t the only weapon that kills.

    I live in Texas and there are a lot of guns in this State. But most of the people I know who own guns treat them very respectfully and their kids understand fully how dangerous they can be.

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  • sallah
    April 17
    2:13 am

    For protection we have a doberman and several baseball bats… I don’t feel the need for the protection of a handgun… but like I said, if people are following the law and following good safety protocols I don’t really have a problem with them…

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  • Oh I’m kind of a nutcase I guess. I believe that a well armed citizenry guarantees a government that will still listen to the people.
    Until I see crime reduced by tough gun laws (such as they have in the UK) I’m just not buying the whole “take guns away and crime will go down”.
    We hunt. We teach respect for guns in our house. We have a gun safe and our children understand guns are NEVER to be regarded as toys. Even BB guns.
    But then, we’re firm proponents of the second constitutional amendment. Our founding fathers were dead set against a government with absolute power. When the regular guy can’t purchase the same gun that an ATF agent uses to kick his door in with, then something is definitely wrong.
    Funny, I’m reading “Miracle at Philadelphia” by Catherine Drinker Bower, the story of the making of the constitution in 1787. Most people don’t know how close we were to having NO Federal government and how Alexander Hamilton wanted a “President for Life” as the executive.
    The second amendment was a direct response to check governmental despotism. And frankly, I think it’s STILL necessary.
    The line between a dictatorship and a benevolent government is fairly thin. I know that’s not a popular opinion, but it’s the one I have.
    I recognize that horrible things happen with guns, but horrible things happen without them too. A gun is a weapon. In the hands of a reckless human being, it’s reckless. In the hands of a responsible citizen, it isn’t.

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  • DS
    April 19
    1:14 pm

    I shudder when I see someone regard a gun as anything other than a tool.

    I was raised in a house where there was usually a shotgun propped in a corner– handy if someone had to go out the door to check on a disturbance among the stock. We all knew how to use a gun, but no one thought of it in terms of a fetish. The only gun accident I remember happening was when a young man tried to crawl through a barbed wire fence with a loaded rifle, dropped it and killed himself- it was used as a strong object lesson about how not to handle a gun. Our worst gun related fear was the first few days of hunting season when all the city people were prowling around– shooting toward buildings, life stock and each other.

    I have met people since who fetishize both the second amendment and guns. My opinion is that those people should never be allowed a gun. If they can’t keep a cool head in a discussion about gun, I do not want them to have access to deadly force.

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  • Chris
    April 20
    2:31 am

    Ever see what a pack of stray dogs can do to a goat or sheep herd? It’s not pretty. They rip and tear and leave parts. At least the coyotes and the wolves don’t chase – they’re just eating them.

    I’m not in fear of my neighbors, but living in the country without a rifle, even if it’s just a little .22 is foolish.

    As far as guns in the household with children – yeah, we grew up with them and we were taught to respect them for the tool they were. There was no horseplay, ever. I think part of the problem with children shooting each other stems from parents not teaching them to respect them. If you treat something as forbidden and some untouchable object, of course that’s what the kids are going to seek out. (See how well the abstinance movement works vs. sex education.)

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  • DS said

    I have met people since who fetishize both the second amendment and guns. My opinion is that those people should never be allowed a gun. If they can’t keep a cool head in a discussion about gun, I do not want them to have access to deadly force.

    Word!

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