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If you could have brain surgery that could help you control your weight, and stop you from eating bad foods, instead of doing it the hard way (e.g. good diet and excercise), would you?

Thanks to CreoleinDC for the question.

21 Comments »


  • Scott
    May 2
    9:48 am

    Hell no! Ain’t no doctor, whether qualified or not, touchin’ my brain unless absolutely necessary.

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  • Girlish
    May 2
    11:48 am

    The NHS already dispenses a weight loss pill that is actually an anti-depressant, really what’s the difference? Neurosurgery is likely less dangerous than bariatric surgery which is VERY risky and has a high rate of both infection and failure.

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  • Seneca
    May 2
    12:47 pm

    No. I’ve never had an issue with weight, so it would be pointless.

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  • Anon76
    May 2
    2:05 pm

    Not a chance.

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  • As somebody who has had issues with weight…it would depend. Namely it would depend on what area of the brain they’d be going into, whether it was laser or a more traditional surgery-and it would depend on how frustrated/how much money/etc, etc, etc.

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  • Lori
    May 2
    4:18 pm

    Brain surgery? That’s scary. Only with a 100% success rate.

    Then again, I’d hate to give up chocolate…

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  • Depends. Is it one of those 0.002% risk of danger surgeries? Or one of those “make your final plans before you go in” surgeries?

    Because if it’s the former, I’m all over it.
    If it’s the latter, hell no.

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  • Emmy
    May 2
    6:05 pm

    For people who have failed at gastric bypass and have multiple co-morbidities that are going to kill them anyways (heart disease, diabetes, ets), it’s a viable option. They have nothing to lose.

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  • While I have struggled a bit with weight for the past ten years or so, it hasn’t been bad enough to make me consider anything beyond exercising and eating well (or at least better 😉 ) but I can see how people whose lives have been greatly impacted by weight struggles would consider it.

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  • willaful
    May 2
    6:51 pm

    Considering how often the medical profession changes its mind about what is and isn’t “bad foods,” the question as put doesn’t really work for me. :-\ I might consider it for sugar addiction, if it seemed reasonably safe. I have diabetes and do struggle seriously with sugar cravings.

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  • When my mom first went to the doctor for her chronic migraines, she joked to him, “Please tell me it’s an operable brain tumor.” He looked at her like she’d lost her mind, but she explained it would be easier for her to have a surgery and recover than to drastically change her lifestyle (which wasn’t unhealthy), or give up possible trigger foods she loved like oranges, raspberries, nuts and coffee.

    So yes, if I struggled with serious weight issues, and it was a fairly non-invasive, low-risk surgery, I’d consider it. I’ve been on Wellbutrin (Zyban) before, and it works for weight loss as well as nicotine addiction, but holy crap did it turn me into a nutcase! And having recently had a week-long stomach flu that had me unable to stomach more than a few hundred calories a day, among other symptoms I won’t describe here, and still not losing a single pound, I’ve come to realize that for some people, more drastic measures than diet and exercise are sometimes necessary.

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  • Speaking as someone who has a thyroid problem and has always battled weight, I would like to believe there was a ‘magic’ cure but there ain’t. Nothing is ever that easy. I’ll continue with meds and the gym – and I’m with Scott…I don’t want anyone messing with my grey matter unless it is absolutely necessary.

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  • Nah. I don’t need anyone messing around with my brain. Last year between April 1 and December 1, I dropped fifty plus pounds by taking a little responsibility for my super crappy eating habits. I stopped blaming the weight on PCOS (yes, it makes you more prone to be chubby but still) and cut out all the bad food. I also worked up to 60-90 minutes of strength training three days a week and long distance running 3 days a week. In November, I ran a 5K charity race–and I was still 200 plus pounds. Yeah, I was last across the line but I finished.

    Now that I’m pregnant, I’m still eating just as healthy and working out, though not as intensely. I know without a doubt I’ll get the rest of this weight off after our daughter is born because I’ve learned the necessary skills: healthy eating and lots of exercise.

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  • Bhetti
    May 2
    10:49 pm

    Heavens, no. Changing exercise and diet permanently makes me happier and it’s something I can do without unnecessary medical intervention.

    That said, I am currently sampling from a 750g jar of chocolate nutella; chocolate’s one thing I can’t give up. Hopefully, it doesn’t become a problem for me.

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  • Bonnie
    May 2
    11:18 pm

    Without question I would do this. I’ve never been truly overweight, but I’ve struggled with it my entire life.

    Yeah, fix my brain. Thanks.

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  • No way would I let anyone touch my brain! I’ll do it he hard way, one pound at a time, eating the right foods and some exercise

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  • Well it’s not like I would miss anything.
    Would it come with a face lift?
    I always wanted to be pretty and dumb.

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  • CindyS
    May 3
    2:21 am

    I would go with last resort.

    I have panic attacks but I’m not sure I would let someone drill into my brain unless death rate was nothing – like seriously. Now, if I was like I was 10 years ago I’d a probably drilled the pilot hole for them – fix it!

    Instead lots of anxiety inducing situations to learn to deal.

    CindyS

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  • Hmm..the choice of surgery involves having my head shaved (well, that’s ok it already is), but then have my skull opened and getting sliced while I’m fully awake -because everyone knows brain surgery patients are never put under. Then after I heal I get to go home and recuperate and pray the surgery hasn’t left any side effects like nerve damage, memory loss or seizures. Oh, and I will probably get a nice scar that will change my hair’s natural part – and I’ll have to grow the hair back by that time if I don’t want the lovely scar earning me a nickname like Ripskull.

    OR if I take door #2: get off my butt, exercise more and eat less. Hmmm. So tough a decision I have lost all appetite for this twinkie on the desk. Dam you, Karen, dam!!!!
    😉

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  • Funny you should bring this up, but I was just watching something like this on Oprah the other day. And I’ll say a resounding Hell No. There is absolutely no way I’d have brain surgery where I’m wide awake. And even if they did put you under for it, I don’t believe there’s any quick fix for weightloss. I know way too many people who’ve had gastric and gained over half or most of their weight back. No thanks.

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  • if there are 0% risk of death why not if it comes with a breast reduction I am in there pronto!

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