HomeReviewsInterviewsStoreABlogsOn Writing
Review: Azteclady does, Dorothy L. Sayers' Whose Body?

Whose Body?, by Dorothy L. Sayers

This wonderfully complicated (yet, at its heart, quite straightforward) mystery is the first of the incomparable Lord Peter Wimsey’s novels1 by Dorothy L. Sayers. Since this novel was first published back in the early 1920s2 there have been a number of editions released, with back cover blurbs ranging from awful to adequate. This one, from amazon.com, is much better than most:

The stark naked body was lying in the tub. Not unusual for a proper bath, but highly irregular for murder—especially with a pair of gold pince-nez deliberately perched before the sightless eyes. What’s more, the face appeared to have been shaved after death. The police assumed that the victim was a prominent financier, but Lord Peter Wimsey, who dabbled in mystery detection as a hobby, knew better. In this, his first murder case, Lord Peter untangles the ghastly mystery of the corpse in the bath.

Indeed, there is a body in the tub, and there is a prominent citizen missing. Wouldn’t it be wonderfully neat if these two were one and the same? Alas, in this case, adding one and one comes up to something in the neighborhood of minus three, and it’s up to Lord Peter to show the police the error of their ways. (more…)

There was a MOVIE, for cripes' sake! *

The topic of the article is serious, and these girls’ illness may or may not be actually related to pollution levels, but the name is Erin Brockovich–not Eric, EriN.

There was a movie and it even got a couple of awards–like an Oscar and the BAFTA and the like.

* * *

(I wonder how soon someone will see it and correct it–rats, I wish I knew how to do a screen capture–though I do have saved the page, I am not sure if an edit would fix the typo there as well as in the source page. Me, Luddite)

 

From the way back machine…1

The Return of Luke McGuire, by Justine Davis (aka Justine Dare)

Originally published in October 2000, this book reminds me why I love so much of Ms Davis’ earlier work, such as The Morning Side of Dawn2. There is an ease to the author’s voice and a realism to the characters, that draws the reader in, time after time. This time, into the story of a once bad boy and an always respectable woman. Here is the blurb (a good one too, for a change): (more…)