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The best male virgin romance I ever read was Bonnie Dee’s Bone Deep. Oh how I loved that book. (you can check out the review here)

The thing is though, there were so many great things about Bone Deep, that the fact that the hero was a virgin, was almost not that important. I mean, I’ve read other books where the hero was a virgin, but I haven’t necessarily enjoyed them.

What do you guys think of virgin heroes? Which books have you read, and did those books work for you? Would you like to see more virgin heroes, or do you ultimately prefer your heroes to be alphas who know their way around a woman’s body and are incredible in the sack?

(You can buy Bone Deep from Amazon.com here

12 Comments »


  • willaful
    March 15
    7:12 am

    I’m one of those who almost has a fetish for them. ;-) Don’t know why. I guess it’s the role-reversal — and it makes them seem so vulnerable.

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  • I like virgin heroes. I’ve written two of them, and will probably do more. I much prefer them to the ho-ish “rakes” that somehow never contract an STD. I loathe ho-ish men in my real life and don’t want to read about them. To me they’re not sexy.

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  • Mireya
    March 15
    1:32 pm

    Honestly, off the top of my head, I can only remember one romance I’ve read which depicted a virgin hero, and it was pretty cheezy now that I think of it. It was Dara Joy’s “Ritual of Proof”, the one that got her in really hot water (Dorchester sued her over it). I think I’ve read others, but I can’t remember them off the top of my head. I am making a note on the one you mention, to check it out. My taste in reading material tends to be like yours.

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  • Jeannie S. (Jeannie189)
    March 15
    1:34 pm

    Love them – they are usually done well (the ones I have read). Jamie from “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon was a virgin, LOVED him! That was probably the first I read with the hero as the virgin and the heroine having “experience”. I am currently reading “Unclaimed” by Courtney Milan where Mark, the hero, is a virgin for his own reasons. He has even written a book about it. The heroine is a courtesan. It’s done very well, and it explores the hidden depths and emotions of both characters.

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  • @Mireya You haven’t read Bone Deep? Go and Kindle it asap! It was a really different book, I’ll be surprised if you don’t like it.

    @Jeannie Oh, I forgot about Unclaimed! I’m trying to think if I’ve read t yet. I think I have, must check.

    @Roslyn, I don’t mind ho-ish heroes, and I have to say, I have a soft spot for male prostitute stories. Well, should I say, the ones I’ve read so far have been excellent.

    @Willaful Which ones have you read then? Any recs?

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  • willaful
    March 15
    4:48 pm

    My GoodReads virgin hero shelf [blush]: http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/2833071-willaful?shelf=virgin-hero&user_id=2833071

    Besides the ones mentioned, I’d recommend Forbidden by Jo Beverley and Pricks and Pragmatism (m/m.)

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  • FD
    March 15
    5:12 pm

    Eh, virginity, male or female isn’t something I look for in a book, although it’s not automatically a turn-off. Good thing too really, considering how ridiculously common it is in romance land. It very much depends on how organic to the character it is – I hate, hate, hate it when it’s fetishised and also where it’s a stop gap to character development aka she’s virgin therefore she’s a good person ugh, ugh ugh. Which now I think of it is interesting: male virginity in romance also tends to be a marker for a good guy hero and that bothers me less, although the Napier I mention below subverts that a little. Particularly with historical romance novels; I wonder if it plays off’ve the contrast with the prevailing rake hero whom we’re expected to believe is a good guy despite his usage of women.

    If I think male virgin books (decent), then what comes to mind is the Jo Bev as mentioned above and a Susan Napier, A Secret Admirer, and the recent Courtney Milan, Unclaimed (liked all of the trilogy).

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  • Las
    March 15
    6:10 pm

    As with female virgins, I have a hard time accepting them in anything but historicals. And even then, they’re not my cup of tea. Bonnie Dee’s The Countess Takes a Lover (LOVE this one) and Milan’s Unclaimed both do a good job with the male virgins.

    I will not read any contemporaries with male virgins (and I only grudgingly accept the ones with female virgins). I just can’t suspend disbelief with that one. In real life most post-college men I know of who are still virgins are either extremely religious or have some other major issue…not qualities I want in a “hero.”

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  • willaful
    March 15
    8:53 pm

    I have an attractive male friend who was a virgin for a surprisingly long time (definitely post college) and I think it was primarily because he tends to overthink things. And it can be a weird step to take — I’d guess the longer you wait, the more important it seems to have the right time/woman.

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  • JoanneF
    March 15
    8:54 pm

    For me, it depends on how, if at all, it fits into the overall story. For the most part, I don’t really care whether the hero or heroine is a virgin or not. One “virgin hero” book that I enjoyed was “The Dangerous Viscount” by Miranda Neville. I found his reluctant obsession with sex after reading his friend’s erotica collection, and his private thoughts and distress on the matter, hilarious.

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  • I love a good virgin hero romance – there’s something so innocent about them – well, dah, and you’re right. Bone Deep is one of the best of them.

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  • [...] piggy-backing this off a thread on Karen Scott’s blog. I like virgin heroes. I like them a lot. I don’t care for the “rake,” reformed [...]


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