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Can Silicone-Enhanced Breasts Ever Be OK For A Romance Heroine?

It hasn’t passed my attention that within romance, enhanced breasts are usually hung on the ‘bitchy other woman’, as if somehow having silicone implants automatically makes her a bad person. This has started to annoy me a little bit. I don’t know, it just seems a tad judgemental.

I don’t think I’ve ever read a book where the heroine had breast implants just out of vanity. I guess it’s not a romantic notion, and let’ face it, no woman wants to read about a hero who’s had his pee-pee surgically enhanced, but I sure am tired of lazy authors giving implants to The Other Woman Who’s Hot For The Hero, in order to confirm her status as a whorish bitch.

Any of you guys read a book where the heroine had a boob job for non-health related reasons?

17 Comments »


  • JoanneF
    April 20
    6:55 pm

    I read an erotic romance novella years ago (can’t remember title or author) where the heroine had a boob job, but it was part of a total-body makeover, including her face, to disguise her identity. Of course, the hero recognized her instantly, so I don’t know if it helped much.

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  • Of course, the hero recognized her instantly, so I don’t know if it helped much.

    I don’t know why, but this made me laugh out quite loudly, lol.

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  • I read Such A Pretty Face last year, women’s fiction, in which the narrator/heroine had a boob job. But that was in the context of significant weight loss and subsequent plastic surgery to be rid of baggy skin, etc., so maybe that’s health-related, too?

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  • Las
    April 20
    7:47 pm

    Since I can’t think of any romances off the top of my head where the heroine was allowed to like how she looks (even though shes gorgeous), I highly doubt we’ll ever see any who’s vain enough to get cosmetic surgery outside of erotica.

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  • But that was in the context of significant weight loss and subsequent plastic surgery to be rid of baggy skin, etc., so maybe that’s health-related, too?

    @JMC Yep, that’s far too good a reason for the plastic surgery. That’s a practical and understandable reason.

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  • Jane A
    April 20
    8:35 pm

    Runaway Mistress by Robyn Carr.

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  • willaful
    April 20
    8:45 pm

    There was a Lavyrle Spencer in which the heroine had a breast reduction, primarily for self-esteem issues, IRRC: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/572623.Sweet_Memories

    Hell, I’m just happy to see a heroine who’s allowed to highlight her hair once in a blue moon. Heroines don’t change their naturally gorgeous appearance, they don’t drink or smoke or use drugs, they don’t wear anything but the most discreet make-up and when dining out, they always order the fish. Because they love it!

    (I’m heavily overgeneralizing, of course…. those are mostly category heroines.)

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  • Chasing Eight – Lorelei James
    http://store.samhainpublishing.com/chasin-eight-p-6359.html

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  • “The Girl Who Played with Fire.” That heroine or more anti-heroine does purely because she comes into a lot of money.

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  • Meri
    April 21
    12:04 pm

    I think I read a Karen Robards RS (Whispers at Midnight, maybe?) a few years ago in which the heroine had gotten implants and was very pleased with them. I remember nothing of the book itself, though.

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  • I was going to say Karen Robards also. The heroine was flat-chested and she got implants. She liked them. The hero liked them. He knew they were fake and didn’t care, which struck me as a realistic guy attitude.

    Why would you get implants for health reasons? I thought they carried health risks, not benefits.

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  • Urrgh! Yes! God, I sometimes fear that one day I’ll have no hair anymore because I rip out strands of it everytime I read books with shit like this. >_<

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  • FD
    April 21
    8:31 pm

    Karen Templeton has one called Pride and Pregnancy. (Yes, it’s an oops book.) The heroine has had three divorces, and has implants and fake nails. I think she may be blonde, (can’t remember if it’s dyed or not) and I’m pretty sure she had a penchant for tight sexy clothes and pink. The archetypal romance heroine, not.
    I’m not a baby-book reader in general, but I recall liking this, and not a small bit was for the sympathetic portrayal of the heroine.

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  • Las
    April 22
    12:51 am

    FD, I have to read that one. I’m always on the look out for heroines that are villainized in most romances. Thanks for the heads up!

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  • I can’t say I’ve read any like that & I don’t think I would – but OMG!!! That picture of Mr. Bean – it’s priceless

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  • KC
    April 24
    11:55 pm

    >Why would you get implants for health reasons? I thought they carried health risks, not benefits.

    One reason would be reconstruction after mastectomy (I know, not usually a romance theme…) There are alternatives to implants, but it seems to be the least invasive if you opt for reconstruction.

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  • [...] that Karen Knows Best said recently — plus the comments -– got me thinking about the body image issues in [...]


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