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I Heard That Dear Author Was Getting Sued, So I Thought I'd Remind Everybody That Tina Engler Married A Convicted Murderer

Elloras Cave get worse and worse. What fuckery is this?

The following was originally posted on KKB on June 15th 2007: Here’s the link.

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JaynieR posted an interview with Tina Engler, AKA Jaid Black on her blog earlier today.

The purpose of the interview appears to be two-fold. Firstly, it seems to be an opportunity for Black to give her side of the story, in terms of her marriage to a *convicted felon, (if the link is broken, search for a David Roy Keen) serving time for shooting, and killing an ex-girlfriend; and secondly, to discuss her feelings, on the failings of the current U.S penal system, and its bias towards the poor, and the uneducated.

Ms Black’s decision to marry a prisoner, serving a life sentence for murder is her affair, and I feel that it would be remiss of me to publicly comment on my personal feelings relating to this matter.

In actual fact, what disturbed me most was Black’s assertion that locking up prisoners is tantamount to human trafficking, and that a person who deliberately takes a life, cannot be blamed for their actions.

When one reads the interview in its entirety, the delivery of her message is staunch, and unflinching, whilst her belief that she speaks a universal truth, appears to be unshakable. (more…)

The comment below was posted by a lady called Angela, claiming to be one of the victims of Jaid Black’s (Elloras Cave founder) husband (you guys remember him right? He’s serving time for murder etc, etc.) The comment was in response to this post, from way back. Some of you may remember the shitstorm it caused.

Anyway, here’s what Angela wrote:

“KAREN
This blog hits home to me because I am also a vitcum of her husband in the case he is serving a life sentence for.
The young womans name that was murdered is Karen also! I am Angela, Karen Stewart’s daughter. One of his charges are for attempted murder against me because after shooting my mother he shot at me and thankfully the bullet wizzed by my head.
I was 14 then and am almost 32 now. That was how old she was when he took her from us (for the rest of our lives).
She was an amazing woman and mother. My daughter is 8 and my step daughter is 14 and they have more heart and brains than this (Jaid) Black woman. Thank you so much for taking up for the victum (my mother)and our family.
Neither of those idiots have any remorse.

A few years ago she contacted me trying any way she could to find a reason to get here low life, “Poor” and “Uneducated” husband, David Keen, out of prison. I was shocked and disgusted.
To respond to Mrs. Tina Marie Keens, AKA Jade Black’s statment, YES he deserves to be alone and have lousy medical, rotten fruits and vegetables and no family.

My brother and I were left without a mother and our children have no grandmother. His victim is DEAD and we have a hole in our lives and are consequently victims and his incarceration is of great value to us and we ALL think he is where he belongs, FOREVER, just as my mother is unfortunatly where she is FOREVER. In that lousy prison system that I am so thankful for.”

I can’t lie, that comment made me feel downright weird, and not in a good way. It also made me feel very sad.

Tina Engler, Founder of Elloras Cave Talks About Her Marriage To A Convicted Murderer, And Airs Her Views On The U.S Penal System

JaynieR posted an interview with Tina Engler, AKA Jaid Black on her blog earlier today.

The purpose of the interview appears to be two-fold. Firstly, it seems to be an opportunity for Black to give her side of the story, in terms of her marriage to a *convicted felon, (if the link is broken, search for a David Roy Keen) serving time for shooting, and killing an ex-girlfriend; and secondly, to discuss her feelings, on the failings of the current U.S penal system, and its bias towards the poor, and the uneducated.

Ms Black’s decision to marry a prisoner, serving a life sentence for murder is her affair, and I feel that it would be remiss of me to publicly comment on my personal feelings relating to this matter.

In actual fact, what disturbed me most was Black’s assertion that locking up prisoners is tantamount to human trafficking, and that a person who deliberately takes a life, cannot be blamed for their actions.

When one reads the interview in its entirety, the delivery of her message is staunch, and unflinching, whilst her belief that she speaks a universal truth, appears to be unshakeable.

Ms Black writes:

“At the time the crime is committed, the male is typically aged 18-25, too poor to retain private counsel, and black. (My husband was poor and white.) Many possess very low IQs and/or are clearly mentally ill. The accused is typically severely depressed at the time of his arrest, and particularly in one-time crimes where violence is involved, suicidal.

During this phase they often don’t care about their own fates and wish they were the dead ones instead of the victim—a normal feeling given what they did and one that resurfaces over and over again throughout their lives. The reason for this extreme guilt and self-hatred is because there tends to be a true remorse amongt these men,”

What Black appears to be saying here, is that we should have more sympathy for convicted felons, because they are often young and foolish, and know not what they do. Plus, they are always remorseful after the fact.

Presuming that this is true for every 18-25 year old who decides to end the life of another, are we to take the route of excusing them for their crime, simply because they were poor, and perhaps their parents didn’t love them sufficiently enough to turn them into decent human beings?

She continues:

If released, they are the least likely group of men to wind up back in prison. (Recall we’re talking about one-time killers here, not serial killers. They are a different breed altogether”

Black’s assertion that felons who have only killed once, aren’t as dangerous as serial killers, seems to be a tad naïve, and slightly disturbing.

The statements that she makes all the way through this interview, at no time, takes into consideration, the rights of the victim, or their family.

“So here is the accused—young, poor, uneducated, morbidly depressed and suicidal—and he’s given a public defender who, if lucky, speaks to him for 20 minutes to an hour before representing him at a trial that will determine his fate forever. (For all the hyperbole one hears about men allegedly getting out on appeal, this happens very, very rarely.)”

Once again, without thought for the victim, who’s life has been deliberately cut short, (don’t forget we are talking murder here) Black suggests that being young, poor and uneducated are viable reasons for us to sympathise with somebody who’s taken the life of another.

“On the other side, representing the state, is a damn good, seasoned lawyer with his/her eye on bigger and better things. They want to be judges, politicians, or well-paid private attorneys. The glory they seek can come only from knowing how to play the game and by playing it well.”

OK, what have we learned thus far?

1. We have learned that every 18-25 year old who goes on to commit murder, is always truly remorseful after the crime has been committed.

2. The public defenders appointed for the accused, are always below par to say the least.

3. Every lawyer representing the state is a damned good lawyer, who doesn’t care about his/her cases, they just want to hit the big time.

Moving on:

“Amongst all this, where you commit a crime is probably more important than what you actually did, at least from a cold perspective. Florida (my husband’s state) and Texas are notorious for giving loooong sentences. In Florida, for instance, you can be found guilty of first degree (premeditated) murder if you had even a second to think about what you are doing. I don’t know too many people who can make calculated decisions in a single second, let alone premeditate a murder,”

In other words, if an armed burglar enters a house, without any intention of killing the occupants, but panics and shoots the homeowner, killing him, then according to Ms Black, this should not be treated as first degree murder, because the Burglar didn’t have time to think about pulling the trigger, he just panicked.

“Off to prison he goes. He has no voice, cannot vote, is locked in a cage and stripped of all human rights and dignity forever. He will be given substandard, third-world medical care by unqualified “physicians” who often times aren’t even legitimate doctors and/or do not speak the convicted prisoner’s native English tongue, making communication all but impossible. His meals are as substandard as his medical care, the fruits and vegetables often rotted.”

But what about the victim? What about the young woman who will not live to see her potential, what about the girl who will never become a bride, what about the girl who’s family were given a death sentence of sorts, when their child was brutally taken from them?

As a parent, if your child was murdered, would you really be worried about the fact that the perpetrator of that murder wasn’t getting the best healthcare, and that they had lost their right to vote?

“The government and big business make a lot of money off legalized human trafficking—a very scary reality. It costs approximately $27,000 USD per year to house, feed and clothe an inmate in Florida and produces a profit of over $100,000 USD per inmate per year for the state. (FYI: this info is readily available on the FL Dept of Corrections website.)”

Human trafficking? Black seems to have missed the point of correctional institutions altogether. Prisons are not supposed to be easy, and her assertion that the whole penal system was set up, just to make as much money as possible seem quite wild, and mostly unsubstantiated.

These places only exist because there are people out there who have no respect for life, who have no respect for other people’s possessions, and who have no respect for the notion of freedom. The financial gains made by the state, is merely a by-product of this.

In the question and answer segment that follows Black’s essay, she writes:

“All of us, with no exceptions, make hideous mistakes. Unfortunately, some of us also make tragic ones.”

Tragic would be killing a young woman who had her whole life ahead of her, one supposes?

“My kids love their (step) dad —my husband—beyond reason. In fact, when they overheard me on the phone talking about doing this interview in light of the emails being sent around (I didn’t know they were eavesdropping), both of them became extremely upset and were crying.”

As I stated earlier, Black’s decision to marry a man who was convicted of killing his girlfriend is her business, and I’m sure that her children do think of him as ‘Daddy’, but I would question whether or not every member of her family is as ecstatic over their relationship as she appears to believe.

“The issue for me as a wife and as an activist is this: Does a man deserve to spend the rest of his life alone and neglected, starved for human affection and attention, because of a deed he committed many, many years ago as a young, immature man?”

It is feasible that a person who commits such a heinous crime as a young man (23), would feel remorse. But is that a good enough reason for him/her to not be punished severely?

Black, insists that her husband is a good person, and that his incarceration is no longer of value to him or his victim.

I suggest that perhaps the victim’s parents would feel otherwise.

One has to wonder if Black would feel the same way, if it was one of her children who had been murdered by a man who was really, really sorry afterwards?

Via Anonymous

Anyone else...

digging the irony of Ann Somerville using a post at Karen Scott’s blog to justify an absolute, un-nuanced defense of Jane Litte of Dear Author?

Ann Somerville quoting Karen Scott

For context: Jane Litte revealed on March 24th that she is also Jen Frederick, a NA author. You can follow some of the resulting asploding heads over here, and then here, and finally here.

At one point, AS posted a comment that could have gotten Jane Litte and company in trouble. Reading between the lines, they offered to edit the offending bits, but she preferred to have the whole thing deleted. Then AS decided to re-post it, with additional commentary, in her own blog. The commentary required linkage for the purposes of proof, hence the irony.

For those of you who don’t want to go there–or in case the blog disappears again–here’re the screenshots, with my own commentary. And, because I’m ornery like that, I’m not giving you the same links AS uses–I believe her narrative is just a wee bit biased, so I’m choosing different links to provide an alternative take on the background information.

(more…)

Happy Birthday To KKB…

Friday, April 13, 2012
Posted in: Happy Birthday KKB

The blog is seven years old today.

Sometimes I feel like I’ve been blogging for way longer than that, other times it seems like it was only yesterday that a mouthy wench started a blog called “It’s My Blog and I’ll Say What I Want To”.

Gosh I remember those days, I’m pretty sure there was nobody in Romland that I didn’t piss off. Remember Cindy Cruciger’s war against the Mean Girls of RomLand? How about when that batshit crazy Kathryn Falk, CEO of Romantic Times accused me of potentially causing authors to commit suicide due to my less than sugary reviews? And the small e-publisher flame-outs that used to happen on a weekly basis? Remember the batshit crazy owners like that Madris DePasture from New Concepts Publishing? How about the grammatically-challenged Patti Rebmann? That Jaid Black interview over at JaynieR’s blog, where we found out that Jaid/Tina Engler had married a murderer whilst he was serving life in prison? Oh, oh, oh, how about that book that was controversially titled, Beautiful Cocksucker? That was just a mess.

Ahhhh, those were the days, eh?

Of course these days I’m a gentler, calmer blogger. (more…)

My pals over at C’um Hither Global have a poll up, and it’s up to you guys to decide who wins the coveted title of Romance World’s Controversy Queen of the Year 2008.

The options, along with the votes so far, are as follows:

Amazon Dot Com – Book seller 1 (3%)

Anne Rice – former erotica writer & outspoken Bill Clinton defender 1 (3%)

Cassie Edwards – author & rumored plagiarist 8 (25%)

EPIC – Electronically Published Internet Connection 2 (6%)

Madris DePasture – Publisher and President, New Concepts Publishing 7 (21%)

Some woman at the RT convention who reportedly ran around with cherries between her boobs 2 (6%)

The RWA – Romantic Writers of America 3 (9%)

Tina Engler/Tina Keen/Jaid Black – Author, publisher & wife of convicted murderer 7 (21%)

Dumbledore – former lover of Grindelwald 1 (3%)

I can’t believe they left out Deborah MacGillivray.

Anyway, it was a toss up between the crazy Madris DePasture, and Cassie Edwards. I had to go with Cassie Edwards, just because of the sheer amount of column inches that were used up, when the plagiarism story broke.

Who did you vote for, and why?

Ye Bloggers of Old, Where Art Thou?

Saturday, January 26, 2008
Posted in: Uncategorized

I came across this great post by CindyS, and it brought home to me, how much Romanceland is missing out by not having the likes of Maili, CrankyReader, and other absentee bloggers around.

Maili’s last blog post was in June 2006 as far as I can recall. I believe her and Will were moving to Germany or something?

Also, although JaynieR and I had a slightly acrimonious parting of ways over the Tina Engler AKA Jaid Black-married-a-convict-and-thinks-murderers-are-misunderstood, lovefest, I still think it’s a shame she’s dropped off from Blogland.

I also really miss, and worry about the girl from the blog, Baghdad Burning. Her and her family were forced to leave Iraq in April, and she’s only written two posts since then. The last post was dated October, when she was in Syria:

The first evening we arrived, exhausted, dragging suitcases behind us, morale a little bit bruised, the Kurdish family sent over their representative – a 9 year old boy missing two front teeth, holding a lopsided cake, “We’re Abu Mohammed’s house- across from you- mama says if you need anything, just ask- this is our number. Abu Dalia’s family live upstairs, this is their number. We’re all Iraqi too… Welcome to the building.”

I cried that night because for the first time in a long time, so far away from home, I felt the unity that had been stolen from us in 2003.

I really hope she’s ok.

Anyway, Cindy also mentioned Jay from Yapaway Jay, another blogger I used to frequent.

And lastly, I miss Monica (shut up Sybil!), I really do. She doesn’t post with any kind of regularity these days, and although many people (including me, may I add) didn’t always like her views, she was one of the few authors who’s blog didn’t bore me senseless, and one of the few on-line authors that I found very difficult to dislike.

Have I missed anybody out?